Module 2 – Restorative Justice

 

– Module 2 –

Pre-Test & Feelings Inventory Intro.

 

Office on Youth’s Online Restorative Justice Program

Course Navigation Reminder

In case you need a refresher at any point during this course:

  1. You can always refer back to ___________ link to see how the different parts of this course work together
  2. If you are not in Module 1 or Module 2 and you need to access this, you can by _______________.

Module 2 Objectives

Assess your current knowledge surrounding RJ concepts:

  1. We need to assess your understanding of the concepts that are part of Restorative Justice.

The importance of understanding emotions (our own emotions, and emotions of others)

  1. We will look at the importance of understanding our own emotions and the importance of understanding the emotions that others have.

Inventory your emotions. Practice makes progress.

  1. Each time you sit down to participate in the online RJ curriculum, we want you to take stock of your emotions. We’ve got some resources for you on that, too.

Introducing the “Feelings Inventory”

We’d like you to take a quick minute or two each week to think about how you are feeling. Each week we ask you to choose two emotions that you are feeling and to list them as part of your participation in the course.

 

We also offer some resources to help you choose which emotions are applicable to you.

The first resource is a video that will give you a better idea of how understanding your emotions will help you in the long run.

WATCH: Emotions, Stress, and Health: Crash Course Psychology #26: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KbSRXP0wik

 

Then come back here and continue the module.

Why is it important for us in RJ class to understand how we are feeling?

(There is no right or wrong here. We just want you to jot down your initial ideas about why this is important enough that we have included it in this program.)

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Why is it important for us in RJ class to understand how others might feel?

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Your Feelings Inventory

The video we just watched offers a great list of reasons to pay attention to how we are feeling. We add a couple of other reasons to the list of why the Feelings Inventory is important to your participation in the this course, more specifically.

We have included the weekly Feelings Inventory because a big part of this program works toward helping you to gain a better understanding of how things affect others. This is also known as empathy. We want to help you build empathy– which pretty much means, we want you to be able to think of things from other people’s perspectives, even if you don’t agree with them, or feel the same way they do. You might be wondering, “If I’m supposed to be thinking about things from another person’s perspective, then why am I talking about how I am feeling?”

There is a good reason we want you to focus on understanding your own feelings. For starters, if I don’t know how I feel, how could I ever understand how you might feel from one situation to the next? If I don’t know how it feels to be embarrassed, I can’t try to help someone who does feel embarrassed. You see how that works? It is easier to relate to others when we understand ourselves fairly well.

If we understand ourselves from one situation or moment to the next, we have a better chance of being able to connect with how others are feeling, even if their reaction might be different from our own.

Here are some other ways that a Feelings Inventory might be useful:

  • You might have heard someone say that they need to check and see if they already have salt in the kitchen before they put salt on the list of groceries to get at the store. They are essentially saying that they need to know what they have and how much of it they have before they can make plans to use it.  
  • A store manager does the same thing. Every so often, they have their entire staff take inventory of what’s currently in the store. As a matter of fact, it is so important to know what is in the store, they use all or most of their human resources (or staff) to help ensure they can account for each item or product in the store.
  • You can look at understanding your emotions as taking an inventory, too. It is very important to know what emotion(s) you have and how much of it you have. So, each week we want you to take a moment to consider how you’re feeling. Pick two words to describe how you’re feeling.
  • To help you consider how you’re feeling we’ve got a couple of charts below that offer different visual representations of emotions and what they mean in relation to other feelings. You don’t have to go in depth with choosing which two emotions you’re feeling each time you work on the RJ program. The visual representations simply help you to determine what seems most accurate in that moment. Use whichever resource is helpful to you. Don’t worry about the rest.

 

 

—  BREAK  —  BREAK  —  BREAK  —

If you haven’t taken a break yet, please do so now.

Take about 10 or 15 minutes to clear your head,

stretch your legs, and get refreshed to come back to this work.

 

 

 

 

 

Feelings Inventory

To help you choose your two feelings each week, the first resource that we offer is a list of different feelings with two parts. Keep reading for more information.

The following are words we use when we want to express a combination of emotional states and physical sensations. This list is neither exhaustive nor definitive. It is meant as a starting place to support anyone who wishes to engage in a process of deepening self-discovery and to facilitate greater understanding and connection between people.

There are two parts to this list: feelings we may have when our needs are being met and feelings we may have when our needs are not being met.

Feelings when your needs are satisfied

 

AFFECTIONATE

compassionate

friendly

loving

open

hearted

sympathetic

tender

Warm

 

ENGAGED

absorbed

alert

curious

engrossed

enchanted

entranced

fascinated

interested

intrigued

involved

spellbound

Stimulated

 

HOPEFUL

expectant

encouraged

optimistic

CONFIDENT

empowered

open

proud

safe

Secure

 

EXCITED

amazed

animated

ardent

aroused

astonished

dazzled

eager

energetic

enthusiastic

giddy

Invigorated

lively

Passionate

surprised

Vibrant

GRATEFUL

appreciative

moved

thankful

Touched

 

INSPIRED

amazed

awed

Wonder

 

JOYFUL

amused

delighted

glad

Happy

jubilant

pleased

Tickled

 

EXHILARATED

blissful

ecstatic

elated

enthralled

exuberant

radiant

rapturous

Thrilled

PEACEFUL

calm

clear-headed

comfortable

centered

content

equanimous

fulfilled

mellow

quiet

relaxed

relieved

satisfied

serene

still

tranquil

Trusting

 

REFRESHED

enlivened

rejuvenated

renewed

rested

restored

revived

 

© 2005 by Center for Nonviolent Communication | Website: www.cnvc.org | Email: cnvc@cnvc.org | Phone: +1.505.244.4041

Feelings when your needs are not satisfied

 

AFRAID

apprehensive

dread

foreboding

frightened

mistrustful

panicked

petrified

scared

suspicious

terrified

wary

worried

ANNOYED

aggravated

dismayed

disgruntled

displeased

Exasperated

frustrated

Impatient

irritated

irked

ANGRY

enraged

furious

incensed

indignant

irate

livid

outraged

resentful

VULNERABLE

fragile

guarded

helpless

insecure

leery

reserved

sensitive

shaky

 

CONFUSED

Ambivalent

baffled

bewildered

dazed

hesitant

lost

mystified

perplexed

puzzled

torn

DISCONNECTED

alienated

aloof

apathetic

bored

cold

detached

distant

distracted

indifferent

numb

removed

uninterested

withdrawn

PAIN

agony

anguished

bereaved

devastated

grief

heartbroken

hurt

lonely

miserable

regretful

Remorseful

 

EMBARRASSED

ashamed

chagrined

flustered

guilty

mortified

self-conscious

DISQUIET

agitated

Alarmed

Discombobulated

disconcerted

disturbed

perturbed

rattled

restless

shocked

startled

surprised

troubled

turbulent

turmoil

uncomfortable

uneasy

unnerved

unsettled

Upset

 

AVERSION

animosity

appalled

contempt

disgusted

dislike

hate

horrified

hostile

Repulsed

 

YEARNING

envious

jealous

longing

nostalgic

pining

wistful

 

SAD

depressed

dejected

despair

Despondent

disappointed

discouraged

disheartened

forlorn

Gloomy

heavy-hearted

hopeless

melancholy

unhappy

wretched

 

TENSE

anxious

cranky

distressed

distraught

edgy

fidgety

frazzled

irritable

jittery

nervous

overwhelmed

restless

stressed out

FATIGUE

beat

burnt-out

depleted

exhausted

lethargic

listless

sleepy

tired

weary

Worn-out

© 2005 by Center for Nonviolent Communication | Website: www.cnvc.org | Email: cnvc@cnvc.org | Phone: +1.505.244.4041

If you are still looking for more ways to get an idea of how you’re feeling, check out this Wheel of Emotions.

 

plutchiks-wheel-of-emotions_with inbetween descriptors.jpg

 

How Does The Wheel of Emotions Work?

The man, Robert Plutchik, who created this colorful wheel of emotions based his work on the idea that there are eight basic emotions. They are joy, trust, fear, surprise, sadness, anticipation, anger, and disgust. Each primary emotion also has a polar opposite, so that:

  • Joy is the opposite of sadness.
  • Fear is the opposite of anger.
  • Anticipation is the opposite of surprise.
  • Disgust is the opposite of trust.

Plutchik created the wheel of emotions in order to illustrate the various relationships among the emotions.


The intensity of emotion decreases as you move outward and increases as you move toward the wheel’s center. The intensity of the emotion is indicated by the color. The darker the shade, the more intense the emotion. For example, anger at its least level of intensity is annoyance. At its highest level of intensity, anger becomes rage.

 

So, now that we’ve discussed why it is important to understand your own emotions, a little about how emotions work and relate to each other, let’s have you choose your two emotions for this module.

 

 

My Two Emotions for Today: (Enter Today’s Date Here)

1.

2.

 

2-1-1

Don’t spend too much time thinking about these prompts. Just put the first thing that comes to mind for each of these. This should be a very quick exercise. We will do this at the end of each module.

Name 2 takeaways from the RJ program so far. (things that have stuck with you, or things you might think about outside of working on the RJ program)

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Name 1 question (related to what we’ve covered so far) that you’d like to get answered in a later debrief.

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Name 1 thing (related to what we’ve covered so far) that you’d like to discuss in a later debrief.

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©2017 – Office on Youth